STEPHANIE DALEY 2007, 91 min. Rated R

Synopsis

When 16 year old Stephanie Daley (Amber Tamblyn) faces murder charges in connection with the death of her newborn, pregnant forensic -psychologist Lydie Crane (Tilda Swinton) is tapped to unravel the truth. The teen claims to have been unaware of her pregnancy but as their sessions intensify, Stephanie's state of denial and Lydie's  fears regarding her own pregnancy leads to a revelation that will change them both.

 

 

FEATURING: Tilda Swinton, Amber Tamblyn, Timothy Hutton, Denis O’Hare, Melissa Leo

Jim Gaffigan, Deirdre O’Connell, Halley Feiffer, Neal Huff, Kel O’Neill, John Ellison Conlee, Vincent Piazza, Caitlin Van Zandt, Marceline Hugot, Kaiulani Lee, Novella Nelson.   Written and  Directed by Hilary Brougher.  Produced by Sean, Lynette Howell, Samara Koffler, Jen Roskind    Executive Producers: Tilda Swinton & Doug Dey. Cinematography by  David Rush Morrison. Edited by Keith Reamer.

 

Filmed in Catskill, Hunter, Tannersville, and Phoenicia, NY. HOW TO SEE IT:  DVDs Are available for sale through Amazon and by rent from Netflix.

 

 

 

 

 

 

BEST DIRECTOR – Milan International Film Festival 2007

 

BEST DIRECTOR –  Jackson Hole Film Festival 2006

 

WALDO SCOTT SCREENPLAY AWARD --Sundance Film Festival 2006

 

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY – (to David Morrison) Woodstock Film Festival 2006

 

BEST ACTRESS –  (to Amber Tamblyn) Locarno Film Festival 2006

 

Nominee – GRAND JURY PRIZE Sundance Film Festival 2006

 

Nominee – BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS (to Amber Tamblyn)  Independent Spirit Awards  - 2007

 

• Sundance International Film Festival 2006

• Locarno International Film Festival 2006

• Deauville American Film Festival 2006

• Milan International Film Festival 2006

• Edinburgh International Film Festival 2006

• AFI Festival 2006

• International Women’s Film Festival Israel 2007

• Bird Eyes Festival of Womens’ Film (London) 2007

• Dortmund/Cologne International Women’s Film Festival 2006

• GirlFest, Hawaii 2007

• Jackson Hole Film Festival 2006

• Woodstock Film Festival 2006

• Maine International Film Festival, 2007

• Sundance at BAM (Brooklyn Academy of Music), 2006

• Williamstown Film Festival, 2007

 

 

 

 

 

 

Awards & Festivals

Press Quotes

 

Full reviews and interviews

Wall Street Journal

Chicago Sun Times

San Francisco Chronicle

Ain't It Cool News

Salon.com

NY Times (intvw)

Gallery

 

Click thumbnails to view.

Behind the Scenes & full credits

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Cinematography notes

Time line of the "making of"

Q&A with Hilary Brougher

Front and End Credits

Photographing Stephanie Daley  - David Morrison

 

"Stephanie Daley" was captured in High Definition video (Sony F-900/3) in various locations in upstate New York. We used Canon Digi prime lenses and occasionally a Canon 10:1 zoom. The idea was to strip the camera down and make it as small as possible, a lot of the houses and offices were small and this sometimes made filming difficult. HD is not an entirely evolved format yet.  Unlike film it has a limited contrast range and excessive depth of field, both of which can hinder the image and ultimately distract the viewer. My responsibility as the Director of Photography was to avoid these pitfalls and achieve our visual goals.

       There were many references in early discussions that helped inform and evolve the look of "Stephanie Daley." The influence that is the most apparent to me now are the paintings of Edward Hopper. His work has a lonely, contemplative feeling, even in populated spaces his characters seem to be lost in private moments. To me that was one of the underlying themes that I saw the first time I read "Stephanie Daley." All of the characters have secrets and we wanted to isolate them from one another within the frame either using architecture, light or composition. I think the bathroom scene with Amber is probably the climax of this idea, she is physically, audibly and visually removed from her environment. The actors were truly incredible and inspiring to work with. Every day I felt lucky to be able to be able to witness and photograph this timely and essential story.

 

On Shooting Hi-Def with David – Hilary Brougher

We chose the format for the usual reasons of economy – also we had a tight schedule, and we needed speed to afford the cast enough time to explore the scenes. David Morrison's expertise was essential to pulling all this off – as was his great attitude and willingness to adapt on a dime.

     We had always discussed a certain naturalism (for example outside light informing interior spaces) and we soon embraced a strategy of being very responsive to our environment - discovering rather than asserting solutions. This is a wonderful way to work (regardless of format) and I think it brought to "Stephanie Daley" a deep sense of place.

 

 

Summer, 1996. First thoughts.

 HB: I write two page of notes about a teenager unsure if she’s pregnant, looking superstitiously for signs and trying to convince herself everything is ok.... I  like the sound of the name Stephanie Daley.

 

1999.

HB:  Another script I have been developing for the last two years just isn’t working out. I decide to write something more naturalistic.  I begin thinking again about “Stephanie Daley” and start researching concealed/surprise pregnancies & cases in which young women are accused of infanticide.

    I am very intrigued by the challenge of a story about characters that live one reality to the world, and another inside and how to communicate that duality. Feels like this is a worthwhile movie to make.

    “Lydie” enters the story....  While I’ve been exploring Steph’s story, I’ve been watching the dramas of my own peers – grown ups becoming parents for the first time. Fascinated by the parallels, I see pregnancy not just as a biological state, but a rite of passage – in itself a psychological transition – like adolescence.  The script is now in two discreet chunks. Part 1 is Stephanie’s story (includes meetings with Lydie) Part 2 is Lydie’s story.

 

Fall, 2001.

HB: The Sundance Institute accepts the script into the Writing Lab. I’m elated. I’ve tried to get in the last 4 years with other scripts. Michelle Satter and Lynn Auerbach begin convincing me the 2-part structure isn’t working and that script must be intercut.  I resist then try it once again. Turns out they are right. Now It’s at least on the right track. The problem big is keeping momentum during transitions between the 2 lines – avoiding redundancy and making the two arcs of Lydie and Steph into ONE.

 

January,  2001.    Hilary attends the Sundance Writer’s Lab for 5 days in Utah.

HB: We climb out of the van at the Sundance resort and are surrounded by tall mountains, crisp white snow and the crazy sweet smell of pinion. All the ”fellows” a bit terrified. We meet twice a day with different advisors. The meetings are intense and each very different. One advisor (who I admired very much and still do) doesn’t like the script and finds the whole thing implausible. I’m crushed but still breathing. But then another advisor seems to like it just as it is...  What begins to emerge from all this is a tougher skin, and a much deeper understanding of my script as seen through many keen eyes. There’s also an emerging sense of community. Writing isn’t easy for any of us – not even the veteran advisors.  A  few strong common notes emerge – as do a number of ways to approach the problems. I become aware of the different strategies writers use – and see that its a matter of customizing to one’s own process. I start consciously assembling my own tool box. Something I’ve never done before.

     After the lab, we all go home and work through ALL the notes.

 

June, 2001. Hilary attends the Sundance directing lab for 4 weeks.

HB: The director’s lab is a much more social extraverted experience. If the writer’s lab asks you to look IN at what you’re doing, the directing lab is really concerned with HOW you’re working with other people – your crew, actors, sets... It’s all about “process.” We’re given grim grey set flat in the hope that we’’’ stop trying to make it too “polished.” It’s fast working and every moment – quite public. Every choice gently observed by the advisors... it’s harrowing at first but then soon, we stop feeling precious about it, and just feel as we feel. We are being pushed to open up and take risks. Self-consciousness gives way to real break-throughs. It’s kind of an astonishing thing – when do we EVER just get to focus on how we do things (in a medium where every on set moment has a price tag). The directing “fellows” all leave tired, intensely grateful – and anxious it’s ending. We  wish we could shoot our films tomorrow. It will take awhile for all of us.

 

Spring, 2002  - HB: Yikes. I’ve just had twins... Hands full.  Still looking for a producer – there’s interest but no real movement. It becomes clear I need to find someone with lots of energy who will take the initiative.

 

Summer, 2002 – The Sundance Institute stages a reading in NYC.

 

Fall, 2002 – Lynn at the Sundance Institute introduces Hilary to Redbone films a Los Angeles based company founded by Jen Roskind, Samara Koffler, Sean Costello.  Hilary meets with Jen in NY and a  few months later,  Redbone begins working together in earnest.  They bring on Dickson-Arbusto Casting (Joy and Nicole).

 

Fall, 2004 – Redbone has secured a commitment for a portion of the budget. Tilda Swinton reads the script on the recommendation of her Agent. Hilary and Tilda meet for coffee in NYC.  Tilda comes on as Executive Producer, and will play Lydie Crane. Graham Taylor at Endeavor actively helps us.

HB: Tilda is gracious and deeply intelligent. She is  also the mother of twins older than my own. I ask advice.

 

December, 2004  The script reaches Amber Tamblyn (thanks to casting directors, Joy and Nicole). Hilary and Amber meet in LA.

HB: I’m immediately struck by 1) yes she looks young  enough! 2) Amber is funny, grounded and very, very brave. A 21 yr old girl who writes poetry as fierce as hers can do this...

Amber says yes!

 

April, 2005 At Jen Roskind’s suggestion, Hilary visits the towns of Tannersville, Hunter and Catskill, NY in Greene County (NY). The Catskill Mountain Arts Foundation has been welcoming and has some ideas about location/office space... There are ski slopes!

   HB: I was born in Catskill and know the mountains from growing up quite near and hiking as a teenager. I am excited about working in a place that I have history, yet where there’s a lot of room left for discovery. I love the Catskills and the idea of filming in them.

 

July, 2005

    Redbone Films is joined by Silverwood Films. Silverwood’s Lynette Howell and Douglas Dey come on as producers. We have financing. We have a finite window in which to shoot (September) before our actors become unavailable. Prep begins immediately.

      HB: I am helping my mother at her house in Upstate NY. It’s good to be in the country. The phone is quiet, and I’m very aware we’ll soon be out of time in terms of actor availability, and that if things don’t come together now, they may never do so. I make my peace with that possibility.  Then the call comes. We’re on. The final piece of the puzzle!

 

July-August, 2005.

   Prep begins in earnest in NY. Joy Dickson and Nicole Arbusto (our casting directors) who we have been working with us for over a year and a half, fly into NY for final casting of the supporting ensemble.  Terry Leonard comes on as Co-Producer and the office comes to life... with the hiring of keys, and last minute research re: military law, forensic procedures etc.   Tim Hutton comes on having been introduced to the script by his agent at Endeavor.  We have the first of many, many meetings about the “deer”  which is to be our big special FX moment. Upstate – scouting is on-going.

  HB: I am introduced to an amazing pool of NY actors and crew.   The work is largely logistical but many key creative decisions are made in this time... The discussions we have about hiring crew are aesthetic decisions in themselves. During auditions, I see the script on its feet... and characters literally “take shape” as Costume Designers Kurt and Bart begin fitting cast and making pregnancy prosthetics!

 

August, 2005

The office transitions to Tannersville, NY.

HB: On the way Upstate, we pick up D.P. David Morrison at the airport. Tilda and Amber come in just a little over a week prior to shooting. We do some scene analysis, we analyze the characters with a psycho-therapist who helps us think about the staging of the psych office scenes. We are constantly looking at locations – the film is almost entirely on real locations – only Lydie’s office is a set – built into the back of the Catskill Mountain Arts Foundation building in Hunter (now I believe it’s a store!)

 

September 7, 2005 First day of principal photography.

HB: We are shooting the scenes in which Lydie visits her friend Jane. It’s a good day. The house belongs to Mary & Charlene who we come to consider the guardian angels of our production in many ways. The first shot we take is Tilda driving her Jeep up the hill. It’s a tricky, older car –full of character - and a bumpy steep hill. It’s this wonderful complete moment unto itself – and we’re off.

In the coming weeks, the crew falls into a healthy familial rhythm. Things look beautiful  Note: for more on the work of D.P. David Morrison – see Cinematography Notes.

 

Sept. 28, 2005    We shoot the bathroom scene and are stunned silent by it.

 

October 6, 2005    Last Day of principal photography. We shoot Lydie’s “roadside” scene at a construction site by the Condos we are staying at...  We shoot all night – Tilda a trooper, working in cold mud. We finish just at dawn. It begins to rain... It rains for four days straight. We’ve finished in the nick of time. Then, back to NYC.

 

October – November, 2005

Hilary joins editor Keith Reamer.  We slug the winter scenes with title cards (our plan is to return Upstate early December) and submit to Sundance with what we’ve got. Once we have it submitted – we try to forget about it and stick to the task of editing.

 

December 1, 2005

 We get into Sundance! We edit and work furiously toward our winter shoot. We pray for snow and check the almanacs

 

December 2,3,4  .Winter Photography – Catskill & Hunter, NY.

It snows the night before we come and then... melts by morning. We shoot the exterior courthouse scenes, and Fall/Winter night exteriors. Then we shoot on top of Hunter Mountain – which is fortunately MAKING snow. Half a day on the mountain top is the most exhausting, exhilarating thing I’ve ever done. The morning after –  when we’re all done and heading home – of course – it snows!!!  Most of the crew has disbanded, but John, our first AC meets David and I at Hunter. We ride the ski-lift  and shoot what will be the first images of the film, the credit sequence. Then it’s done.

 

December 5-15, 2005  We race to picture lock – with a few small test screenings scheduled.  The film runs 110 mins.  As a result of the screening notes, we bravely cut away 20 minutes of screen time...  and lock at 90 mins. The Sound design team (Tom Paul/The Cottage) is working away – and composer, David Mansfield is beginning the score. Volker Durre at Adams Morioka designs the credits.

 

December 28, 2005  David Morrison and Hilary color time at RIOT! in Los Angeles with  extraordinary timer Siggy Ferst. We can’t believe how good it looks.  We finish early.

      Thanks to a grant through the Sundance Institute, we will have a HD to 35mm blow-up from PAC Title in Los Angeles. We see test footage. It looks wonderful.

 

Jan 6-12, 2005

     David Mansfield finishes recording the score.

     Samara Koffler, Tom Paul and Hilary mix for four days on nine hours sleep at Tom Paul’s cottage an hour north of NY.  We bond. We hallucinate, then return to the City do the mix master.

 

January 13, 2005.  David, Jen and Samara check the answer print in Los Angeles.

 

January 18, 2006 We arrive in Park City. The producers carry the print from LA. We are winded by the sheer force and concentration of the festival – and nervous.

    HB: This is the first time I will see the print – and it will be in the company of the audience...  The producers, and much of the cast and crew are here.  I am keenly aware that soon team Steph Daley’s work is largely (not entirely) done... and I’ll miss working with everyone terribly because they have become like family... so we focus on being together one last time, and it’s beautiful.

 

 

 

This encapsulates the answers to the most frequently asked post-screening questions from the festival circuit.

 

1- Q. Why did you write this script?

A. I made a film in 1997 called the “Sticky Fingers of Time.” It was playful with lots of clever plot twists.  After that, I wanted to challenge myself to write something more naturalistic, more character-driven.  I became interested in telling the story about a person who has stepped off the PATH of “who they think they are” and the resulting split of identity. I became interested in the idea of concealed and/or denied pregnancy in teens. I did some research and found it happens even more often then reaches the headlines.  The task I gave myself in developing Stephanie’s story was to without judgment, observe HOW it could happen.

Meanwhile some of my peers (grown-up women) were getting pregnant – and I began thinking about what they were going through and the resonances to Stephanie’s storyline -- the things unsaid, superstitious thinking, and a sense of feeling powerless in the face of biology. This wasn’t an easy script for me to write and I thought about shelving it many times. But then... I hadn’t seen quite this film before,  exploring the shadow side of pregnancy, and so I thought it worth taking the chance.

 

2- Q.  Is the film based on a real incident?

A. No. It’s well-researched and the context is intended to feel plausible and ring true. But it’s entirely fictional.

 

3- Q.  How long did it take to write the script, and get it made?

A. The script took forever (check out the “making of” timeline) to write and  find the right team to produce it.  But once we were up and financed, the time from first day of prep to premiering on-screen at Sundance was a miraculously efficient six months.

 

4. Q. Are you trying to make a political statement?

A. No... and yes. What I wanted to do was open up events that we are accustomed to dealing with in the media in an emotionally charged yet superficial way – and rather than delivering a verdict about it,  open up the gray areas for discussion.  I hope audiences engage and make the film their own. And if there is a moral to this story, it’s that small things left unsaid can add up to big hurts, and conversely small moments of real connection can start to turn things around. In the spirit of this, I want people to leave the movie talking to each other!

 

5. Why did you cast Tilda, Amber and Tim?

 

A. I’ve been watching Tilda's films for years and I’ve always been struck by the intelligence and spirit she brings to her work and that she can tap strong emotions without sentimentality. We met briefly in a coffee shop last Fall and talked mostly about our own pregnancies and kids.  The script was somewhat secondary to our conversation – and that turned out to be the nature of making the film, conversational, warm, and curious.

       What struck me about Amber when we first met was her honesty. She's confident and happy in her own skin, brain & spirit and thus can navigate anything in her work. She’s fearless, real and writes beautiful poetry entirely her own.  She's also very funny (as is Tilda) and I think that was a blessing on the set.

       Tim had an immediate connection with Paul (Paul's an architect and Tim's a carpenter in his own right).  We met and talked about living in the country, trust, marriage and parenthood. Tim brought to Paul a wonderful mix of vulnerability and resolve.

 

6 Q. Deer/Cats/Water?

B. Pregnancy is a biological state – and the deer/cats/water tie into Lydie and Stephanie’s growing awareness of this. Also, the deer are a reality of living in a rural/suburban area. They are fragile, quiet things and they often end up dead under our wheels, reminding us of the randomness and force of death. They are one of the “signs” Lydie and Step look for/read into...

- Cats. Steph and Lydie are both characters  “keeping their feelings to themselves.,” Interacting with the cats, they reveal themselves without being expository. I also use animals in films because I think they belong in human stories.

- Water. Like Lydie’s driving. It’s habit. A cycle. I’m interested in observing the big shifts that take place in small moments...

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7 Q.  The Earring?!

a.  I’m going to try to address this in a way that doesn’t spoil it for folks who haven’t seen the film yet.  I think a big question the movie is asking: how do we deal with that which we can’t know or control. We face this blatantly in PREGNANCY – when though we do our best to be on top of things, ultimately BIOLOGY is in control... Also some of this “you’ll never know” stuff also occurs in marriage and the earring ties into that.

 

8 Q.  Talk about the bathroom scene...

a. Okay. But it’s all Amber. Seriously... She prepared for this scene and the meat of it we did in about 4 long, hand-held exploratory shots (2 thru the door, 2 within the stall). The thing I did right was not get in the way. We shot this near the end of our production schedule – and I’m glad, because there was a sense of comfort and trust among us all by then. Amber’s performance was incredibly moving while we were shooting it, and I remember thinking... This is the film’s chest cavity wide open, and its heart beating here in front of me.   I think this scene moves people because it speaks of concealment.  At some time or another, ALL of us (male or female, old or young) have struggled to stifle hurt behind a thin door beyond which, goes on life as usual.

 

9 Q. About the “ending.”

A. I’m not going to get specific in consideration of  those reading this without having seen the film yet. But I can say this. We did toy with various other endings. This one simply FELT right because it’s actually a beginning... not an ending. That’s what I wanted to audience to leave with – the sense that a small, real human connection that has been made, and from here these women will move on.

 

FRONT ROLL CREDITS:

 

RedBone Films /

Silverwood Films Presents

 

TILDA SWINTON

 

AMBER TAMBLYN

 

TIMOTHY HUTTON

 

“STEPHANIE DALEY”

 

DENIS O’HARE

 

JIM GAFFIGAN

 

DEIRDRE O’CONNELL

 

HALLEY FEIFFER

NEAL HUFF

KEL O’NEILL

 

JOHN ELLISON CONLEE

VINCENT PIAZZA

CAITLIN VAN ZANDT

 

MARCELINE HUGOT

KAIULANI LEE

NOVELLA NELSON

 

AND MELISSA LEO

 

Casting By

NICOLE ARBUSTO

JOY DICKSON

 

Co-Producer

TERRY LEONARD

 

Production Designer

SHARON LOMOFSKY

 

 

Costume Design by

KURT AND BART

 

Sound Design by

TOM PAUL

 

Composed by

DAVID MANSFIELD

 

Edited by

KEITH REAMER

 

Director of Photography

DAVID MORRISON

 

Executive Producer

TILDA SWINTON

 

Executive Producer

DOUG DEY

 

Produced by

SEAN COSTELLO

LYNETTE HOWELL

 

SAMARA KOFFLER

JEN ROSKIND

 

Written and Directed by

HILARY BROUGHER

 

 

END CREDIT ROLL

CAST (in order of appearance):

 

STEPHANIE DALEY            AMBER TAMBLYN

JEFF                                       VINCENT PIAZZA

JENN                                      CONSTANCE WU

RHANA                                  HALLEY FEIFFER

MIRI DALEY                                    MELISSA LEO

INTERN                                 MICHAEL NOSTRAND

JOE DALEY                           JIM GAFFIGAN

REPORTER #1                      SUSAN FERRARA

LYDIE CRANE                      TILDA SWINTON

DR. PETERSON                    NOVELLA NELSON

PAUL CRANE                       TIMOTHY HUTTON

JACK HUTCHINSON          JOHN ELLISON CONLEE

MR. THOMAS                      NEAL HUFF

TERI THOMAS                    JENNY NAY

PASTOR                                KAIULANI LEE

RHANA’S SISTER                ADELIA SAUNDERS

PRATT                                   HARRY ZITTELL

KAREN                                  TRICHA LAFACHE

COREY WHITE                     KEL O’NEILL

ELIZABETH                          JILLIAN CUZZOINO

JANE                                      DEIRDRE O’CONNELL

FRANK                                  DENIS O’HARE

ROY GILCREST                    GENE GALLUSHA

MRS. GILCREST                  MARION MCCORRY

SATIN                                                CAITLIN VAN ZANDT

MR. SCALESI                        ALI REZA

MRS. WERNER                     MARCELINE HUGOT

LAMAZ TEACHER             SUSAN KERNER

TEEANGE BOY                    DAN MCCABE

 

BACKGROUND ACTORS

 

COREY’S FRIEND                SAGE FRANCIS

COREY’S LAWYER              DAVID MORRISON

STEPH’S LAWYER               WILLIAM MALLEY

THOMAS BABY                  JACK MEHLMAN

GAS STATION ATTENDENT        MICHAEL WEDD

BOY #2                                   ALEX DEY

PARAMEDIC #1                   DAVID BODENSCHATZ

PARAMEDIC #2                   ROBIN HOMMEL

PARAMEDIC #3                   RICHARD ECK

RESCUE SQUAD #1             STEPHEN TUOMEY

RESCUE SQUAD #2             MARK HOMMEL

BAND LEADER                   AARON CLAREMONT

MARCHING BAND

MOLLY BURTIN, SIOBHAN BOYLE, BEHAN DUNCAN, JEREMY DUNCAN, JEN DOBIES, ASHLEY EISENLAU, ALEX JACOBS, GREG JASON, PATTILYN MCLAUGHLIN, STEPHEN PRESTON, MATT SCHLOSSER, MEGHAN SHAFER, JESSA SUHNER, KAYLA TIRPAK, WESLEY TUNISON, CAITLIN WILSON

LAMAZE CLASS      MICHELLE BEHAN, AARON VAN DYKE, LISA VAN DYKE, MARK HELLER, JOHN MARTIN, DEIRDRE MORGAN, ADAM PAYNE, KATHRYN PAYNE

 

SKI LODGE BATHROOM GIRLS:

GILCREST PARTY GOERS:  MARY DICKINSON,  CHARLENE FISHER,  ALAN ALTER,  ARLENE & JACK STAMM,  ALEXIS MANICE,  MAD HATTERS MOM, BETH & PETER BARKER, SUZY AND XXX FERRIS

JENN’S HOUSE PARTY GOERS:   WES HALL,

 

FIRST ASSISTANT DIRECTOR     MARIELA COMITINI

SECOND ASSISTANT DIRECTOR            NICK BELL

 

ART DIRECTOR      INBAL WEINBERG

 

SCRIPT SUPERVISOR         RACHEL CONNORS

 

FIRST ASSISTANT CAMERA        JOHN REYES

SECOND ASSISTANT CAMERA   WILLIAM BALL

STILLS PHOTOGRAPHER CAROL COHEN

BEHIND THE SCENES VIDEOGRAPHER            MARK HELLER

 

GAFFER        EVIN LOWE

BEST BOY ELECTRIC         JOY WEBER

THIRD ELECTRIC   DAVID PESTKA

ADD’L BEST BOY ELECTRIC       RYAN WEBB

 

KEY GRIP      JON STERN

BEST BOY ELECTRIC         JEREMY RODRIGUEZ CAMACHO

SWING           MIKE QUIGLEY

ADDITIONAL KEY GRIP   MARSHALL MACOMBER

G&E INTERN            CHRISTINA LYNNE

G&E INTERN            ALEXA HARRIS

 

SOUND MIXER        JUDY KARP

BOOM OPERATOR JAIME REYES

 

HAIR DESIGN          MICHAEL KRISTON

WIG DESIGN            JAN ARCHIBALD

KEY MAKE UP ARTIST     LEO WON

KEY HAIR STYLIST            LORETTA ALSTON

ADDITIONAL HAIR STYLIST       THEODORA KATSOULOGIANNAKIS

ADDITIONAL MAKE UP ARTIST           DAVID KALAHIKI

 

WARDROBE SUPERVISOR            SARAH LAUX

ADDITIONAL WARDROE SUPERVISOR            SARAH APPLETON

ADDITIONAL WARDROBE          AARON COBBETT

WARDROBE INTERN         DAVID REGAN

PREGNANCY SUIT JOHN KRISTIANSEN

 

SET DECORATOR   LENNY TSO

LEADMAN   MICHAEL AHERN

SET DRESSER           KEITH LLEWELYN

SET DRESSER           DANIELLE LOMBARDI

SET DRESSER           BRIGID MCCAFFREY

 

RESIDENT ARTIST SANDRO KOPP

 

PROP MASTER        ED CHICHIK

 

CREATURES FABRICATED BY JULIE GOLLINS

 

SPECIAL EFFECTS COORDINATOR       PETER KUNZ

SPECIAL EFFECTS ASSISTANTS  PENELOPE KUNZ

SPECIAL EFFECTS ASSISTANTS  TIM HAWKINS

 

PRODUCTION ACCOUNTANT    RENEAU SKINNER

 

PRODUCTION COORDINATOR  TORREY LIDDELL

ASSISTANT PRODUCTION OFFICE CORDINATOR    NICOLE L. KARCZEWSKI

DIRECTOR’S ASSISTANT  JENN STAMM

PRODUCER’S ASSISTANT            GABRIEL GONZALEZ

ASSISTANT TO SILVERWOOD FILMS    NISSA CANNON

OFFICE ASSISTANT           DIANE MCLEAN

OFFICE INTERN      SAM BADEN

DRIVER         DAN LEVY

PRE-PRODUCTION SECRETARY MARISSA PRICE

 

LOCATION MANAGER     MORGAN PATTERSON

ASSISTANT LOCATION MANAGER      BRENT KORSON

LOCATION SCOUTS           BILL & JEAN STITT

LOCATION INTERN           VICTOR SANTIAGO

LOCATION INTERN           LANSING MOORE

 

MILITARY LAWYER CONSULTANT      STEVE BRAND

CRIMINAL LAWYER CONSULTANT      RAY COLON

FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGIST          KRIS MOHANDIE

PSYCHOTHERAPY CONSULTANT         LAURA PETRILLO

PEEPER WRANGLER          TOM TYNNING

 

ANIMAL WRANGLER COORDINATOR JOYCE GOLDENBAUM

ANIMAL WRANGLER        JEFF GOLDENBAUM

ANIMAL WRANGLER        TRACY WEISS

ANIMAL WRANGLER        JIM DICKERSON

ANIMAL WRANGLER        LUKE PATTERSON

ANIMAL WRANGLER        CATHY SPERDUTO

AMERICAN HUMANE       BILL REICH

 

CATERING   AMY’S TAKE AWAY INC.

CATERER/COOK     AMY JACKSON

CATERER/COOK     JEFF SCHLOSSER

CRAFT SERVICE      ROSARIO CUETO RUA

CRAFT SERVICE      DONNA MERWIN

 

KEY SET PRODUCTION ASSISTANT      PEYTON COLES

FIRST TEAM PRODUCTION ASSISTANT          JUSTIN RIGBY

SET PRODUCTION ASSISTANT   CREEL C. BROWN

SET PRODUCTION ASSISTANT   DAN FEY

SET PRODUCTION ASSISTANT   JAMAL BREWER

 

WINTER UNIT

 

LINE PRODUCER    RENEAU SKINNER

 

PRODUCTION MANAGER           TORREY LIDDELL

 

ART DIRECTOR      LENNY TSO

 

FIRST ASSISTANT DIRECTOR     CHARLES LESLIE

SECOND ASSISTANT DIRECTOR            NICOLE REAL

 

SCRIPT SUPERVISOR         JESSICA VOLPE

 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY  DAVID MORRISON

FIRST ASSISTANT CAMERA        JOHN REYES

SECOND ASSISTANT CAMERA   WILLIAM BALL

STILLS PHOTOGRAPHER IAN RUTTER

BEHIND THE SCENES VIDEOGRAPHER            MICHAEL NOSTRAND

 

SOUND MIXER        KEVIN SEAMAN

BOOM OPERATOR ADAM SANCHEZ

 

GAFFER        WALTER STRAFFORD

KEY GRIP      NICOLE EMMONS

BEST BOY GRIP       VANCE TUCKER

SWING           DAVID GUTNIK

 

WARDROBE SUPERVISOR            SARAH LAUX

 

KEY MAKE-UP ARTIST     DAVID KALAHIKI

KEY HAIR STYLIST            THEODORA KATSOULOGIANNAKIS

 

PROP MASTER        MICHAEL AHERN

 

LOCATION MANAGER     BRENT KORSON

 

CATERERING          AMY’S TAKE AWAY, INC.

CATERER/COOK     AMY JACKSON

CATERER/COOK     JEFF SCHLOSSER

 

KEY PRODUCTION ASSISTANT  GABE GONZALEZ

SET PRODUCTION ASSISTANT   KATHERINE ALIX-GAUDREAU

SET PRODUCTION ASSISTANT   DAN FEY

SET PRODUCTION ASSISTANT   JENN STAMM

DRIVER PRODUCTION ASSISTANT       DANIEL GONZALEZ

 

POST PRODUCTION

 

POST PRODUCTION SERVICES PROVIDED BY            TEATOWN COMMUNICATIONS

 

COLOR CORRECTION SERVICES PROVIDED BY COMPANY 3

 

COMFORM PROVIDED BY ENCORE

 

FILM NEGATIVE SERVICES PROVIDED BY PAC TITLES

 

FILM PROCESS AND PRINT PROVIDED BY DELUXE LAB

 

MIXED AT THE COTTAGE

 

AUDIO POST PROVIDED BY        GIGANTIC STUDIOS

 

SOUND EDITOR, FOLEY ARTIST            ERIC MILANO

SOUND EDITOR      BEO MORALES

ASSISTANT SOUND EDITOR       ADRIANO FREIRE

SCOTLAND ADR EDITOR ALISTAIR GEORGE

 

ASSISTANT EDITOR          ALI MUNEY

 

COLOR CORRECTIONIST SIGGY FERSTL

 

MUSIC SUPERVISOR          LIZ REGAN

MUSIC CONSULTANT       JACK BRADLEY

 

TITLES           ADAMS MORIOKA

 

DEVELOPED WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF THE SUNDANCE INSTITUTE

 

THIS FILM WAS MADE POSSIBLE IN PART WITH SUPPORT FROM  THE SUNDANCE INSTITUTE’S ANNENBERG FEATURE FILM FELLOWSHIP

 

LEGAL SERVICES PROVIDED BY            SLOSS LAW, LLP

 

DISTRIBUTION ADVISORY SERVICES BY         CINETIC MEDIA

 

PUBLICITY SERVICES PROVIDED BY    THE DART GROUP

DO YOU WANT TO LIST EVERYONE HERE???

 

INSURANCE PROVIDED BY         TRUMAN VAN DYKE

 

CAMERA PROVIDED BY   LIMAN VIDEO RENTAL

 

PAYROLL SERVICES PROVIDED BY       MEDIA SERVICES

JOSE CASTRO